Jacqueline DeMeritt | Castleberry Peace Institute

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Jacqueline DeMeritt

Title/Position: 
Associate Professor of Political Science
940-565-2247
Office: 
Wooten Hall 167
E-mail Address: 
jdemeritt@unt.edu

Jacqueline DeMeritt is Assistant Professor of Political Science. She specializes in human rights, including explanations for rights violations as well as opportunities for international actors to protect vulnerable individuals. Current research focuses on how state leaders choose among repressive tools (torture, killing, disappearance, etc.), on how those leaders respond to international attempts to publicize widespread abuse, and on why low-level perpetrators participate in government-ordered slaughter. Other research interests include the application of quantitative methodology and formal theory to social scientific processes. Her work has appeared in such journals as the American Journal of Political Science and Conflict Management and Peace Science. She received her PhD from Florida State University in 2009.

Recent Publications:

"After War Ends: What Colombia Can Tell Us About Peace and Transitional Justice." Published as a book. 2019.

"Political Context and the Consequences of Naming and Shaming for Human Rights Abuse." With J. Esarey. Published in International Interactions 43(4): pp. 589-618. 2017.

"The Strategic Use of State Repression and Political Violence." Published in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Politics. 2016.

"Transitional Justice: Prospects for Post-War Peace and Human Rights." Published in What Do We Know About Civil War?. 2016

"Delegating Death: Military Intervention and Government Killing." Published in Journal of Conflict Research 59(3): pp. 428-454. 2015.

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